Dry Fly Fishing – Tips and Techniques

Dry Fly Fishing – Tips and Techniques thumbnail

When new anglers embrace the intricate world of fly fishing the ultimate goal is to catch a trout on a dry fly. The iconic image of a fly angler floating down the river or wading through a stream with a rod bent over from a heavy fish that has taken your dry fly is the peak of our sport for many. Approaching dry fly fishing with a few helpful hints will enhance your fishing experience and increase your success. 

Fly selection:

The most important factor to dry fly fishing success is fly selection. Size, silhouette, and color steer the selection process when choosing a dry fly.

Size falls under the old adage of “match the hatch” anglers need to choose flies that mimic the same size of the insects that are actively emerging. Fish become very selective during the hatch and size is the most dominant factor.

Silhouette refers to the shape of the fly on the water. Mayflies are easily mimicked with a parachute dry fly. Caddis can be copied accurately with the appropriately sized elk hair caddis. Grasshoppers have a very distinctive shape that even anglers recognize from a distance. The size and shape of the predominant insect in your watershed are the factors you should strive to imitate.

Color is the last factor in dry fly selection and can often be more for the angler than the fish. Dry flies become very difficult to track in broken water for anglers and fish. Indicator or Hi-vis dry flies allow for the first two factors, size, and silhouette, to seal the deal while the bright color assists anglers in setting the hook. Color could be as simple as changing the body color of your caddis fly from tan or olive to black. Trout notice the difference.

Dry Fly Dressing:

A dry fly is an adult bug that belongs on the surface in the air. Very few situations allow for a dry fly to be fished effectively drowned. Therefore there is a necessity to dress your dry fly for optimal performance.

Aquel, Flyagra and Shimishake are just a small sample of the myriad products available for dry fly dressing. Aquel made by Loon Products is an industry leader in environmentally safe products. Aquel is applied in small amounts with your fingers before the casting begins and is reapplied riverside when needed. Flyagra is a liquid you dip your fly into. Not so environmentally safe. This product needs to be applied ahead of time for the best effectiveness. Shimishake is a dry powdery desiccant you shake your fly into. The shake is used on the water and will require reapplication regularly to maintain high floating flies.

Leaders and Tippet:

Trout have an inquisitive eye requiring long leaders and fine tippets to present a dry fly effectively. Leaders longer than 9 feet in length and thin tippets are necessary in highly pressured waters like many tailwaters. Catch and release sections allow trout to become educated requiring extra stealth to entice a dry fly bite. I recommend the Scientific Anglers Freshwater Leaders as they come in a variety of sizes and lengths. The standard dry fly leader would be a 9′ 5x one.  

Casting:

Accuracy is critical to put the fly where you need whether wading or float fishing. Misplacing your cast by inches can be the difference between a hookup and a pretty drift. As your skills improve a reach mend performed during the cast extends the effectiveness of your cast.

The Drift:

The drift, the way your dry fly floats upon the water, is critical to selling your dry fly. Careful mending both upstream and downstream is the only way to deliver your dry fly with the illusion of reality. Well-timed mending presents the fly for the longest amount of time unmolested by drag or negative water currents. 

Hatches:

Seasonal hatches are predictable for the time of year and water temperatures. However, rely on your fly shop for up to date info. Be aware of simultaneous hatches such as Pale Morning Duns emerging alongside Yellow Sallies as this is a common occurrence on Colorado rivers.

Be Observant:

Watch before you cast or enter the water. Knowing where the fish are feeding and what bug they are eating gives you the edge when you make your first cast. The observant angler understands where to place their first cast and that is often all it takes.

Best Positioning:

As part of being observant, there is always the best position for presenting your dry fly. Whether there are casting obstacles, difficult surface currents or mid river structures moving into the best position minimizes troublesome conditions. This is a task more easily achieved wade fishing by repositioning your casting angle. Positioning is crucial in netting your fish too.

Stealth:

Move slowly when wading. The slow-moving angler has more time to observe and spooks less fish. Wearing naturally toned clothing helps to hide the angler allowing for more accurate casting, less mending and better positioning. The angler bumping boots off underwater rocks and logs has already alerted fish of your presence. Be stealthy.

Dancing Game:

After the hook set, be prepared to move. Don’t stand still, now is the time to dance. Sitting square, boots planted in the river or without arm movement is a quick way to loose a fish during the fight.  Repositioning yourself for landing the fish is a regular occurrence.

Targeting trout with dry flies is the ultimate goal in fly fishing. Approaching dry fly fishing with these key points in mind will not be as intimidating to beginning fly fishers. Enhance your next fly fishing experience by booking a dry fly trip with your local fly shop. And to experience dry fly fishing in the most picturesque trout country in all of Colorado contact Vail Valley Anglers. Located in the heart of the Colorado Rockies Vail Valley Anglers specializes in float and wade trips that focus on dry fly fishing. Vail Valley Anglers can be reached here.

This article is written by Michael “Sal” Salomone (www.michaelsalomone.com) a trout fly fishing guide and writer based in the mountains of Colorado at Vail Valley Anglers. Photos by the talented Nolan Dahlberg @dahlberg.digital. Follow along with them at @vailvalleyanglers for the latest in trout fishing in the west. 

Float Fishing for Beginners – 10 Tips for Fly Fishing from a Raft or Drift Boat

5 Reasons Why the Scientific Anglers Amplitude Smooth Flyline is Superior

Winter Fly Fishing Tips: Making the Most Out of Winter Fly Fishing

The Top Rated Fly Shop in All 50 States, Part I

The Top Rated Fly Shop in All 50 States, Part I thumbnail

What is the best fly shop in your state?

This is a very subjective question. But in a day and age when online reviews actually have an impact on the success or failure of a business, we have something close to objective data to work with. I’ve looked at a few review aggregations, and compiled a list of the top rated fly shop in all 50 states.

This doesn’t mean that the shops listed are, in fact, the best. More importantly, it isn’t a slight at other excellent fly shops that aren’t listed. Of course, there are some factors that propel the ratings of certain shops over others: being in a metropolitan area, offering guide services, and even catering to a demographic that is more willing to leave an online review. Still, these online reviews are a legitimate 21st century indicator of a place – and people – that anglers appreciate.

In part I, I list the first 25 states: Alabama – Missouri. Is your favorite fly shop on the list?

Continue reading “The Top Rated Fly Shop in All 50 States, Part I”

The Largest Freshwater Lake In The World: How To Find Fish (And Catch Them)

We’re on Lake Superior, home to more than 20 million surface acres of water! We’re here to catch fish without any outside help. How do we find bass in such a vast environment? Where do we start looking? Come along for an amazing journey as we explore the largest freshwater lake in the world in search of Smallmouth bass.

The key to breaking down such a massive lake is to forget how big it really is. Start with a map of the entire lake, pretend the lake is only 500 acres, and pick your key spots. No matter how big a pond, lake, or ocean is, they all have the same key “spots”. Once you’ve selected points or coves that look good, its time to zoom in. Its at this point that you begin to see how giant the lake really is. Take each key spot you identified and break it down into smaller and smaller key spots. Now its time to begin fishing! Remember that in a lake this big not every spot will be a home run, stick to your pattern until you find the fish you’re searching for.

In today’s video the guys fished for 3 days. They found fish each day and were able to dial in the pattern a little better at each stop. While they never found the “motherlode” of big bass spots, they found some awesome fishing and had a great time on a fishery neither angler will ever forget.

Interested in finding out more about Cobi? Visit his Instagram page here: http://bit.ly/2XMpoPW

Below is a breakdown of the baits and equipment we used on this once in a lifetime mission to explore the smallmouth of Lake Superior.

The baits in order of appearance…

-Keitech Fat Swing Impact 4.3: http://bit.ly/2ab7s8v

-Matt Allen Swimbait Head 3/8 oz: http://bit.ly/29RrTYN

-Megabass Okashira Screw Head 1/16 oz: http://bit.ly/2EpluSA

-Megabass Spark Shad: http://bit.ly/2XcLZk4

-Megabass Vibration X Ultra: http://bit.ly/2GdQFjs

-River2Sea Bling Spinnerbait: http://bit.ly/2diSwqq

-Keitech Fat Swing Impact 2.8 (Electric Shad): http://bit.ly/2ab7s8v

-Dirty Jigs Guppy Head 1/8 oz: http://bit.ly/2nyUJRS

-6th Sense Crush 50 Squarebill (Wild Shad): http://bit.ly/2HbaCGT

-Megabass Vision 110 (GP Pro Blue): http://bit.ly/2j31TKb

Matt’s Favorite Combo from the trip…

Rod- G Loomis Conquest 902S SJR: http://bit.ly/2BiGUNi

Reel- Shimano Stradic Ci4+ 2500: http://bit.ly/2gu84t7

Line- Sunline Sniper Fluorocarbon 5 lb: http://bit.ly/2p7fxju

Cobi’s Favorite Combo from the trip…

Rod- Megabass Orochi XX WhipSnake: http://bit.ly/2XkVoej

Reel- Daiwa Tatula 4000: http://bit.ly/2zrq4id

Line- Power Pro Braid 10 lb: http://bit.ly/2g9c2GV

Leader- Sunline Sniper Fluorocarbon 7 lb: http://bit.ly/2p7fxju

lake suprior.jpg

Rock Out With The All-New Heavy Tungsten Line

Rock Out With The All-New Heavy Tungsten Line thumbnail

Tungsten is the most precious metal to all fishing enthusiasts, for its increased sensitivity and durability. The Heavy Metal Tungsten brand celebrates this metal with another awesome form of metal: Rock & Roll. Through head-banging rock and all the themes associated with it, Heavy Metal Tungsten forms one of the most electric brands of jigs and jig heads are known to anglers today. With a rockin’ product for almost any terminal technique, the Heavy Metal Tungsten lineup will provide you with hardworking, longlasting, and environmentally baits specifically designed to help you catch the bigguns.

Tungsten Dropshot Weights

The most popular drop shot weights are the ball-shaped sinkers, but there are times when you need a stick-shaped weight for catching bass around specific types of cover. The stick weight can be considered a finesse sinker because its slender shape allows it to slide through grass, brush or other thick covers without snagging. You can also drop shot with this weight along bottoms with boulders because it slips easily through the rock crevices whereas the ball-shaped weight tends to roll and get stuck in narrow cracks. The stick weight is also ideal for drop shotting in heavy current because the cylinder shape allows the weight to drift with the flow and tick the tops of the rocky bottom without rolling down into the rocks where it can get snagged.

Bullet Sinkers (Flipping And Worm)

A bullet weight sinker can be used in virtually any presentation but you’re two most popular bass applications will be Flipping and Pitching or fishing a Texas rig. When flipping or pitching you tight to cover or dense vegetation, make sure to peg your rig. If you’re fishing sparse grass or open water, an unpegged weight will create confidence performing an action. When unpegged, your bullet weight sinker will slide up your line and free fall when fished. This creates a slower fall and also makes your plastic look like it’s chasing a baitfish (the bullet weight). We all know bass are competitive so this can also help trigger strikes.

Carolina rigging a tungsten sinker is ideal for dragging along soft bottom like sand or mud. Tungsten weights will also shine when fished near hard structure like shell beds, rocks, and gravel bottoms. The added sensitivity will help increase noise and sensitivity. Drop a tungsten weight and a lead weight on some blacktop or concrete and you’ll be able to hear the difference these two metals will make.

Tungsten Shakey Head/ Ned Rig

Tungsten ned rigs and shaky heads will help you provide a downsized profile while getting your bait down to the bottom quickly. Target shallow water with the light the lighter Ned Rig models in the 1/8 and 1/10 oz version and step up to the heavier models for fishing in deeper water, heavy wind, or current.

The shaky heads will be best served offshore when fishing points, reefs, humps, saddles, and other structure where bass roam. Whether you’re marking fish on a graph or just have your eye on juicy looking point, tie on the Heavy Metal Tungsten Shaky Head.

Tungsten Football Jig

Offshore fishing and football jigs are the most popular use case for football jig fishing. By design, football jigs are meant to be fished around rocks and structure typically in deep water. The football-shaped head helps the jig head rock-n-roll through rock, timber, and other offshore structure. Make long casts with the Heavy Metal Tungsten Football Jig confidently knowing that its light weed guard and the sticky sharp hook will help you pinfish with long-distance hook sets.

Dry Fly Fishing – Tips and Techniques

Dry Fly Fishing – Tips and Techniques thumbnail

When new anglers embrace the intricate world of fly fishing the ultimate goal is to catch a trout on a dry fly. The iconic image of a fly angler floating down the river or wading through a stream with a rod bent over from a heavy fish that has taken your dry fly is the peak of our sport for many. Approaching dry fly fishing with a few helpful hints will enhance your fishing experience and increase your success. 

Fly selection:

The most important factor to dry fly fishing success is fly selection. Size, silhouette, and color steer the selection process when choosing a dry fly.

Size falls under the old adage of “match the hatch” anglers need to choose flies that mimic the same size of the insects that are actively emerging. Fish become very selective during the hatch and size is the most dominant factor.

Silhouette refers to the shape of the fly on the water. Mayflies are easily mimicked with a parachute dry fly. Caddis can be copied accurately with the appropriately sized elk hair caddis. Grasshoppers have a very distinctive shape that even anglers recognize from a distance. The size and shape of the predominant insect in your watershed are the factors you should strive to imitate.

Color is the last factor in dry fly selection and can often be more for the angler than the fish. Dry flies become very difficult to track in broken water for anglers and fish. Indicator or Hi-vis dry flies allow for the first two factors, size, and silhouette, to seal the deal while the bright color assists anglers in setting the hook. Color could be as simple as changing the body color of your caddis fly from tan or olive to black. Trout notice the difference.

Dry Fly Dressing:

A dry fly is an adult bug that belongs on the surface in the air. Very few situations allow for a dry fly to be fished effectively drowned. Therefore there is a necessity to dress your dry fly for optimal performance.

Aquel, Flyagra and Shimishake are just a small sample of the myriad products available for dry fly dressing. Aquel made by Loon Products is an industry leader in environmentally safe products. Aquel is applied in small amounts with your fingers before the casting begins and is reapplied riverside when needed. Flyagra is a liquid you dip your fly into. Not so environmentally safe. This product needs to be applied ahead of time for the best effectiveness. Shimishake is a dry powdery desiccant you shake your fly into. The shake is used on the water and will require reapplication regularly to maintain high floating flies.

Leaders and Tippet:

Trout have an inquisitive eye requiring long leaders and fine tippets to present a dry fly effectively. Leaders longer than 9 feet in length and thin tippets are necessary in highly pressured waters like many tailwaters. Catch and release sections allow trout to become educated requiring extra stealth to entice a dry fly bite. I recommend the Scientific Anglers Freshwater Leaders as they come in a variety of sizes and lengths. The standard dry fly leader would be a 9′ 5x one.  

Casting:

Accuracy is critical to put the fly where you need whether wading or float fishing. Misplacing your cast by inches can be the difference between a hookup and a pretty drift. As your skills improve a reach mend performed during the cast extends the effectiveness of your cast.

The Drift:

The drift, the way your dry fly floats upon the water, is critical to selling your dry fly. Careful mending both upstream and downstream is the only way to deliver your dry fly with the illusion of reality. Well-timed mending presents the fly for the longest amount of time unmolested by drag or negative water currents. 

Hatches:

Seasonal hatches are predictable for the time of year and water temperatures. However, rely on your fly shop for up to date info. Be aware of simultaneous hatches such as Pale Morning Duns emerging alongside Yellow Sallies as this is a common occurrence on Colorado rivers.

Be Observant:

Watch before you cast or enter the water. Knowing where the fish are feeding and what bug they are eating gives you the edge when you make your first cast. The observant angler understands where to place their first cast and that is often all it takes.

Best Positioning:

As part of being observant, there is always the best position for presenting your dry fly. Whether there are casting obstacles, difficult surface currents or mid river structures moving into the best position minimizes troublesome conditions. This is a task more easily achieved wade fishing by repositioning your casting angle. Positioning is crucial in netting your fish too.

Stealth:

Move slowly when wading. The slow-moving angler has more time to observe and spooks less fish. Wearing naturally toned clothing helps to hide the angler allowing for more accurate casting, less mending and better positioning. The angler bumping boots off underwater rocks and logs has already alerted fish of your presence. Be stealthy.

Dancing Game:

After the hook set, be prepared to move. Don’t stand still, now is the time to dance. Sitting square, boots planted in the river or without arm movement is a quick way to loose a fish during the fight.  Repositioning yourself for landing the fish is a regular occurrence.

Targeting trout with dry flies is the ultimate goal in fly fishing. Approaching dry fly fishing with these key points in mind will not be as intimidating to beginning fly fishers. Enhance your next fly fishing experience by booking a dry fly trip with your local fly shop. And to experience dry fly fishing in the most picturesque trout country in all of Colorado contact Vail Valley Anglers. Located in the heart of the Colorado Rockies Vail Valley Anglers specializes in float and wade trips that focus on dry fly fishing. Vail Valley Anglers can be reached here.

This article is written by Michael “Sal” Salomone (www.michaelsalomone.com) a trout fly fishing guide and writer based in the mountains of Colorado at Vail Valley Anglers. Photos by the talented Nolan Dahlberg @dahlberg.digital. Follow along with them at @vailvalleyanglers for the latest in trout fishing in the west. 

Float Fishing for Beginners – 10 Tips for Fly Fishing from a Raft or Drift Boat

5 Reasons Why the Scientific Anglers Amplitude Smooth Flyline is Superior

Winter Fly Fishing Tips: Making the Most Out of Winter Fly Fishing

Paddle Board Set Up for Fishing

Here’s a look at a Paddle Board set up for fishing.  A paddle board is a fun way to play outside on the water with your family, and get a little fishing in. Check this article out about my set up for paddle board fishing and why it works well. This article includes a run down of a good board, what type of fishing gear to use, and some video action of paddle board fishing. Plus, a price break down of different boards out there on the market for fishing. Hopefully, this will help you if your deciding on getting a paddle board for fishing. Enjoy!

Continue reading “Paddle Board Set Up for Fishing”

The Top Rated Fly Shop in All 50 States, Part II

The Top Rated Fly Shop in All 50 States, Part II thumbnail

What is the  best fly shop  in your state?

This is a very subjective question. But in a day and age when online reviews actually have an impact on the success or failure of a business, we have something close to objective data to work with. I’ve looked at a few review aggregations, and compiled a list of  the top rated fly shop in all 50 states.

This doesn’t mean that the shops listed are, in fact, the best. More importantly, it isn’t a slight at other excellent fly shops that aren’t listed. Of course, there are some factors that propel the ratings of certain shops over others: being in a metropolitan area, offering guide services, and even catering to a demographic that is more willing to leave an online review. Still, these online reviews are a legitimate 21st century indicator of a place – and people – that anglers appreciate.

In  part II, I list the second 25 states: Montana – Wyoming. Is your favorite fly shop on the list?

Continue reading “The Top Rated Fly Shop in All 50 States, Part II”

Summer Night Fishing Tricks For Bass

Its time to go night fishing! Many big bass turn nocturnal in the Summer, feeding heavily while anglers sleep. They’re able to move shallow and ambush prey while the lake is quiet. Today Tim gives some key tips and tricks to take your Summer night fishing for bass to the next level! This isn’t another video about throwing a black and blue jig, get ready!

Night fishing is all about stealth. The lake goes quiet as the sun sets and the fish become very aware of unnatural sound. If you’re out on the water with lights on, you’re slamming locker lids, or you’ve got your motor turned up high, the fish will know you’re there. If you take the time to slow down, quiet down, and select natural baits, it can be the best fishing of your life!

Tim goes in depth about color selection, moon phase, and so much more. Listen closely to the quick tips because they will make all the difference! Listen especially close to the information about how the moon impacts color selection. Knowing when to throw a bright color, versus a natural color, versus a dark color can be the difference between catching huge fish and catching no fish at all.

Below is a breakdown of the baits discussed in the video to help you fish with confidence this Summer.

Jig and Trailers…

-No-Jack Flipping Jig 1/2 oz: http://bit.ly/2fx8YBI

-Reaction Innovations Beaver: http://bit.ly/29W3RZW

-Strike King Rage Craw: http://bit.ly/2uoqsLJ

-Jig Rattles: http://bit.ly/2kIQ0dH

Curly Tail Worms and Stick Baits…

-Berkeley Power Worm 10″: http://bit.ly/2cxomPX

-Zoom Ol’ Monster Worm: http://bit.ly/2adPtjs

-Magnum Baits 10″ Stick bait: http://bit.ly/2KBhPWU

-Hag’s Tornado Bait: http://bit.ly/2Ydvm9j

Texas Rig Hardware…

Hook- Gamakatsu 6/0 Superline Wide Gap: http://bit.ly/2ac92XG

Weight- Swagger Tackle Tungsten Worm Weight 1/2 oz: http://bit.ly/2NjDYtV

Stopper- 6th Sense Peg X: http://bit.ly/2bHjowk

Spinnerbait/Chatterbait/Swim Jig…

-Revenge Heavy Duty Double Willow 3/4 oz: http://bit.ly/2b7GBrs

-Evergreen JackHammer Chatterbait 1/2 oz: http://bit.ly/2popvj6

-Dirty Jigs California Swim Jig 3/4 oz: http://bit.ly/2auXfmx

Crankbaits…

-Strike King 10XD: http://bit.ly/2gHT4F0

-Strike King 6XD: http://bit.ly/2ery44M

-Norman DD22: http://bit.ly/2LKB37w

Topwater…

-Whopper Plopper 130: http://bit.ly/2bsPbQV (Loon, Powder)

-Brabec Double Buzzbait: http://bit.ly/2OVAfjy (Black, White)

-Spro BBZ 8″ Trout Wakebait: http://bit.ly/2cU1x5P

-Spro BBZ 1 Rat: http://bit.ly/2tHDGyU

-G Ratt Swimming Rat: http://bit.ly/334OEk1

-Johnny Rat Wakebait: http://bit.ly/2uHIoxO

Night Fishing web.jpg

Save Plastics, Save Money

Save Plastics, Save Money thumbnail
Mike Iaconelli
Mike Iaconelli

One of the questions I get all the time is how to keep a plastic bait from sliding down the hook. I get it. Ruined plastics don’t catch bass and they can get to be expensive over time. Here’s how I’ve learned to solve that problem: Use a screw-type, spring looking bait keeper when you thread your plastic on your hook, but not in the way you might think.

You know what I’m talking about. It’s a screw looking, spring-like bait keeper with a ring on top. Some people call it a hitch hiker. The way it’s supposed to be used is by attaching the ring on top of the screw to your hook and then screwing the spring into your plastic. This keeps the plastic on the hook.

Hitch Hiker
Bait Keeper (aka Hitch Hiker)

But there’s another way that works even better, and it’s more versatile. Don’t attach the ring on top to the hook. Just screw the entire bait keeper into your plastic, all the way in until the ring is buried and out of sight.

Then push your hook through the inside of the screw and out the bottom. This won’t interfere with the way you rig your plastic. It’ll work anyway you want. But, what it will do is keep the bait from sliding down the shank of the hook. And don’t worry about it interfering with your hookset. It won’t.

Hook Through the Nose
Hook Through the Nose

These bait keepers come in a variety of sizes. Make sure you have a few of each and don’t pay much attention to what size the manufacturer puts on the package — large, medium or small. There’s no standard. The sizes will be different from one manufacturer to the next. 

I know this sound crazy but it really does work. Practice with some of your old hooks and baits. Once you get the hang of it your fishing will be closer to hassle free and you’ll save a lot of money that you can use to buy other fishing stuff. 

___________________________________________

 

 

Click Here to See Exactly How Mike Does it

 

___________________________________________

Like Ike on Facebook,  and follow him on Instagram for fishing and fun content.

Subscribe to Mike’s YouTube channel, Going Ike,  to ensure you see every adventure video.

Return to Mike Iaconelli’s website

Stream Fishing Big Smallmouth In Clear Water!

The guys found a small creek loaded with smallmouth bass! The water is crystal clear and the fish are in all 3 stages of the spawn. There are fish just coming in from Lake Michigan, other bass on beds, and a lot of big bass cruising the edges and shadows in search of a big meal. Realizing the opportunity, the guys quickly began catching fish on everything from a dropshot to a swimbait. Come along for an exciting day of fishing and teaching as we explain how to fish for bass in current.

Its early Summer in Michigan and the fish are aggressive! We began by catching fish sitting along the edges of cover but as we moved farther up river we discovered spawners in the shallows. Toward the end of the day we realized post spawn fish would ambush reaction baits as well, catching them on swimbaits, jerkbaits, and topwater.

Fishing in current is all about understanding bass behavior. These fish face up stream and feed by sight. They’re watching the moving water for any sign of food drifting by. When a meal appears they have one shot to capture it as it passes so strikes tend to be vicious! While neither angler had ever been on this fishery, Cobi guides in both Michigan and Wisconsin on a lot of amazing smallmouth waters. If you’re interested in seeing more of his work, visit his instagram here: http://bit.ly/2XMpoPW

Below is a breakdown of the baits we caught fish on throughout the day. We caught them on an incredible variety of techniques so we will separate them into softbaits and hardbaits, including the colors used to successfully fool these smallmouth.

Softbaits…

1) Finesse Jig (Kentucky Craw): http://bit.ly/2eJinXo

-Smallie Beaver (Green Pumpkin): http://bit.ly/2dR6CkP

2) Strike King Half Shell (KVD Magic on Dropshot): http://bit.ly/2iR9awm

-Owner Mosquito Light Hook Size 2: http://bit.ly/2zQVKx3

3) Roboworm 4″ Fat Worm (Oxblood Light on Dropshot): http://bit.ly/2awYSxM

4) Megabass Spark Shad 3″ (Real): http://bit.ly/2XcLZk4

– Megabass Okashira Screw Head: http://bit.ly/2EpluSA

5) Dark Sleeper Swimbait (Haze): http://bit.ly/2TyR1GT

6) Zoom Super Fluke (Smokin Shad): http://bit.ly/2aqys0H

-Gamakatsu Finesse Wide Gap 1/0: http://bit.ly/2aKGmHM

Hardbaits…

1) Splash It Popper (Chartreuse Pearl Shad): http://bit.ly/2Fp8MQV

2) River2Sea S-Waver 168 (Light Trout): http://bit.ly/2aiu8Sh

3) Megabass Vision 110 Jerkbait (PM Twilight Chart Back): http://bit.ly/2j31TKb

Matt’s most versatile Combo this trip…

Rod- Shimano Expride 6’10” Medium: http://bit.ly/2nTq9FL

Reel- Aldebaran MGL 50: http://bit.ly/2uQ4oH8

Line- 12 lb Sunline Assassin: http://bit.ly/2h4LNjm

New Thumb.jpg