NEW: YETI LoadOut GoBox for Camping

NEW: YETI LoadOut GoBox for Camping thumbnail

YETI LoadOut GoBox Payne OutdoorsThe YETI LoadOut GoBox leaves nothing to be desired when it comes to utility and durability. Designed for secure organization, this versatile gear fortress is ideal both on-the-go, or back at basecamp.

YETI LoadOut GoBox Payne Outdoors

YETI is offering the chance to win a kitted out YETI LoadOut GoBox™ curated by YETI Ambassador Conrad Anker. People can enter for a chance to win a YETI LoadOut GoBox™ packed with Conrad’s favorite camping gear by following YETI on Instagram and commenting on the LoadOut GoBox™ Ambassador Gear Sweepstakes Instagram post. The giveaway opens on May 2, 2019, at 8:00 AM CST and ends at 11:59 PM CDT on May 10, 2019.

YETI LoadOut GoBox Payne OutdoorsThe waterproof and dustproof GoBox can hold and protect everything from duck calls and rangefinders, to tippet and camera lenses, thanks to the included removable caddy, compartment divider, and Pack Attic™ deployable pouch. The LoadOut GoBox is built to be nearly indestructible—ready to endure seasons in the sun, negative temps in the field, and repeated abuse being lugged in and out of the truck, the boat, and the blind. And when it’s all said and done, the GoBox stacks up neatly until your next adventure.

“We are passionate about delivering products with a combination of exceptionaldesign, function and reliability that are natural extensions of the YETI brand,” says YETI CEO, Matt Reintjes. “With the GoBox, we have taken your standard storage box and turned it into a product with endless versatility and unprecedented reliability”.

YETI LoadOut GoBox Payne OutdoorsThe LoadOut GoBoxwill be available for purchase through yeti.com for $249.99, starting in May 2019. Available colors include white, tan, and charcoal. Accessories included: Divider, Caddy, and Pack Attic™. For more information regarding YETI’s new Spring 2019 products, please visit yeti.com.

YETI LoadOut GoBox Payne Outdoors

About YETI Holdings, Inc.

YETI is a designer, marketer, retailer, and distributor of a variety of innovative, branded, premium products to a wide-ranging customer base. Our brand promise is to ensure each YETI product delivers exceptional performance and durability in any environment, whether in the remote wilderness, at the beach, or anywhere else life takes you. We bring our products to market through a diverse and powerful omni-channel strategy, comprised of our select group of national and independent retail partners and our DTC channel. By consistently delivering high-performing products, we have built a following of engaged brand loyalists throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, and elsewhere, ranging from serious outdoor enthusiasts to individuals who simply value products of uncompromising quality and design. Our relationship with customers continues to thrive and deepen as a result of our innovative new product introductions, expansion, and enhancement of existing product families, and multifaceted branding activities.

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Karl’s Crankbait Color Guide

Karl’s Crankbait Color Guide thumbnail

New lure color patterns are entering the market on a daily basis giving anglers more and more color options to choose from. While bait variety is a good thing, it can also make lure color selection an added challenge.

Picking the right bait can be like splitting hairs. To help out, we’ve put together a quick read to help guide you through the lure color selection process. At the end of the day, the more time you spend fishing and the less time you spend puzzledly staring into a tackle box, the better.

Blueback Flash

Blueback herring are a schooling baitfish commonly found in waterways along the eastern seaboard. These baitfish have a unique blend of colors (silver, blue, green) which are represented throughout the Blueback Flash colorway. In addition to looking like a scrumptious herring, this pattern has is a proven fish catcher in water without herring. There’s just something about it this color that bass can’t get enough of.

Burnt Craw

Throw red in the spring. Throw red in the spring – If you’ve fished crankbaits before you’ve likely heard this line. While this saying may get redundant, it’s true. Bass move shallow and feed heavily on crawfish during the early spring so accurately representing these creatures is key.

Chartreuse Gill

Bass love Bluegills and bass anglers love chartreuse so, we blended two effective color patterns into one (making it twice as good). The Chartreuse Gill color is perfect for summertime patterns, stained water, or when bass are feeding heavily on bluegill, pumpkin-seed, and other panfish.

Fire Craw

Karl’s Fire Craw pattern will help spark bites when other colors just won’t cut it. The detailed design pattern paired with a color scheme that accurately represents a crawfish make this bait a top choice in any lake home to crawfish. During the pre-spawn phase, bass will push up shallow and gorge on any available forage, which often times ends up being crawfish. Tie on your favorite crawfish pattern each spring and get to work!

Ghost Gill

The Ghost Gill pattern has a translucent bottom with a gently painted pattern of a bluegill. Color patterns of this style typically work best in clear or pressured waterways that contain healthy panfish populations. Light colored and natural baits are always a player in clear water, especially on sunny days!

Ghost Pro Shad

Our Ghost Pro Shad is essentially a toned down version of the classic OG Sexy colorway, Bass tournaments are continually won on Shad style baits so, providing a toned down version of such a proven color just makes sense. The Ghost Pro Shad pattern will help you put a unique twist on a proven color.

Highlighter

If you’re not into sport fishing chances are you’ve never heard of ‘Chartreuse’. However, in the bass world, this color gets thrown around all the time. Partially for good reason, it’s a color that just seems to catch fish. Karls Highlighter cranks will stand out in stained and muddy water when fish need a little help keying in on visual indicators.

Moonlight Shad

While some may look at this color and think stained water, it’s actually a killer in clear and calm water as well (Especially for smallies). When you’re looking for a subtle bait that still puts off a unique look, try Karl’s, Moonlight Shad.

OG Sexy

Virtually every crankbait company on the market has a shad colored crankbait with accents of yellow and blue. It’s a proven color pattern that catches fish. To sweeten the deal, manufacturers typically coin their versions around a flirtatious name which is good at catching anglers. We didn’t re-invent the wheel with this one but we’ve given the people what they wanted with our OG Sexy colorway.

Top Fishing Jig Trailer Color Combo’s – Which Jig & Trailer Colors Work Best for Bass!

This article is a guide for knowing what top jig fishing trailer color combinations to use, so you can catch more bass. There are so many different colors, and trailers for your jigs it’s hard to know where to start. This post will help guide you through 4 different jig and trailer color combinations that will work in every type of situation you encounter fishing. Hopefully, after reading this post you should be able to pick the right jig and trailer when you are out bass fishing, so you can catch more pf them and enjoy the outdoors. Get stoked!
Continue reading “Top Fishing Jig Trailer Color Combo’s – Which Jig & Trailer Colors Work Best for Bass!”

Float Fishing for Beginners – 10 Tips for Fly Fishing from a Raft or Drift Boat

Float Fishing for Beginners – 10 Tips for Fly Fishing from a Raft or Drift Boat thumbnail

I remember the first time I got in a boat and began float fishing down the river, it seemed foreign, like I was learning how to fly fish again. I was confused with where to cast, how to mend, which way to set the hook. The river moved fast and I wasn’t prepared for the life of me to make the correct cast. But, as the day went on it began to click and I realized, exactly how effective float fishing is and the best part is you are able to spend the day fishing along with the people in the boat. It’s a ton of fun. It makes sense why a lot of anglers have boats and pay to go out in boats with guides, it opens up a ton of fishing opportunity.

For all the skiers and snowboarders out there, I like to compare resort skiing as wade fishing and float fishing to backcountry skiing/snowboarding. Typically the progression of an angler or skier/snowboarder starts with the basis of wade fishing or resort skiing. After some time enjoying the activities, the person will progress into a backcountry skier/snowboarder or float fishermen. Both take some investment to get the right gear and usually some sort of safety training. Both open up endless opportunities and fun for that matter.

Over the years, float fishing has become my preferred method to fish. By all means, the techniques and tactics of float fishing are far different than wade fishing. I’ve learned various techniques and different tips from guides alike. So here are some fundamental tips that every angler should look to abide by out on the river when your fly fishing from a raft or drift boat.

Tip 1. Cast Downstream

This one seems like a no brainer. It’s not, train yourself to fish the water that is upcoming. More often than not a beginner float angler will be consistently casting perpendicular or behind the boat, resulting in a shorter drift. Look ahead, take your time and make a cast downstream, and enjoy the nice long drift. Engrain this in your head, “Cast Downstream.”

Tip 2. Use Heavier Tippet

The rigging for float fishing should be slightly different than wade fishing. I recommend stepping up your breaking strength of tippet. So if you typically use 5X, try 4X or 3X. It will result in fewer flies lost to the bank and more fish to the boat. The best part is it’s better on the fish, they don’t get over exhausted. I use the Scientific Anglers Fluorocarbon Tippet for streamers and nymphs and the Scientific Anglers Fresh Water Tippet when tossing dries.

Tip 3. Use a Longer Rod

The industry standard rod length is 9 feet. For float fishing step up your rod length to a 9.5 foot or 10 foot rod. The extra length gives you control, mending, setting the hook and punching that cast becomes that much easier. It may seem weird at first, but trust me you will be switching over your wade fishing rods to 9.5 or 10 footers in no time.

Tip 4. Observe the Speed of the River

Most trout streams vary in different types of water from rapids, riffles, deep pools, to stagnant lakes. Every part of the river has different speeds. As a float angler, take a mental note of the speed of the water as you come upon it. If you are fishing slower water you know you will probably have more time to pick apart the water with multiple drifts. When the water is faster, the boat will be moving through the water more quickly. So cast a little more downstream and focus on hitting that one quality pocket than trying to cover all the water. Quality over quantity.

Tip 5. Save The Glory Casts for the Practice Pond

You’re not going to catch fish with your flies overhead. Get them in the water and fishing! Instead of focusing your efforts on making that perfect cast to hit that juicy small pocket with snags all around it, just make that cast right off your rod tip. It’s surprising how many fish can be caught under your rod tip.

Tip 6. Learn the Reach Mend Cast

Float fishing is fast paced, one way to get more hookups is to utilize the reach mend cast. What it does is allows your line to lay down onto the water so you don’t have to mend, so your fly is fishing as soon as it hits the water. To dial in the reach mend cast, as you cast across the current and power forward with your cast begin to reach the rod upstream. The reach will put your line upstream from the fly and you will have “pre-mended” your flies. It’s that easy.

Tip 7. Line Management – Assess the Boat for Snags

Think of the boat as a giant stump and it is easy to get a snag on. A few areas to always make a mental note to avoid are, the oars, the anchor or front of the boat. Take a look around your feet and the edges of the boat and familiarize yourself with any potential snags from your slack line. This plays a huge factor when fishing streamers due to the excess of slack line. It is also important to strip your line in when you are not paying attention so your flies don’t snag when you’re not looking.

Tip 8. Adapt Your Fly Patterns and Rigging

Fly selection plays a huge factor in float fishing. Typically, the super technical rigs with multiple split shots and tiny midges or dries aren’t “float proof.” Adjust your rigs to be more friendly to float fishing. I use heavier tungsten nymphs and bigger brighter dries that float well. The ideal rig would be a 7.5 foot 2x leader with size #6 Chubby Chernobyl and 2 feet of 3X tippet and a tungsten jig pheasant tail. This is what I consider “float proof”. The rig is highly visible and the stronger strength of the tippet and leader mean fewer tangles and re-rigging. Resulting in more time with the flies in the water. Tippet Rings are also an awesome addition to every float anglers rig, as they reduce rigging time in the boat. Fish flies that are easy to fish, don’t get too technical.

Tip 9. Work as a Team

My favorite part about fly fishing from a boat is it is a team effort. The oarsmen’s skills matter just as much as the angler. Open communication between the boat members is the key to success. The general rule of the boat is the water in front of the oars is for the front angler and the water behind the oars is for the angler in the back. Making sure everyone is on the same page will result in fewer tangles and more hookups. If you are fishing in the back feel free to poach the juicy water up front, just communicate to the boat that you’re going to. Be vocal, if you snag on the bottom be sure to let the oarsmen know.

Tip 10. Safety First

Float fishing can be dangerous and the rivers claim lives of anglers every year. Always put safety first and fishing second. One simple way to always be safe out on the water is to always wear a life jacket. Make sure to have it buckled and tight. Make sure you are familiar with the waterways and up to date on any stream changes and flows. You never know when danger may strike or when you can lend a hand to save someone else in danger. It’s important every angler understand the basics of whitewater safety. Spend a few minutes talking about some safety points like “high sides” or “strainers.”

Fly fishing from a boat is a highly effective method to target trout. It can open up endless new areas to fish and can be a great way to spend some time on the water with friends. To experience world-class trout fishing from a boat, Vail Valley Anglers offers half day and full day float trips year-round in the Central Rockies of Colorado. Check them out online here.

Article from former Vail Valley Anglers guide and Managing Editor of Flylords Mag Patrick Perry, give him a follow on Instagram at @patperry.

Photos courtesy of Nolan Dahlberg, Marketing/Media Lead at Vail Valley Anglers. Be sure to check them out on Instagram @vailvalleyanglers.

Colorado’s Snowpack up over 160% from Annual Average

Madison River Boat Rescue

The Salmon Fly Hatch

Fluke Rigging Tricks to Catch Bass Shallow or Deep

Learn how to use a soft jerkbait as a topwater, a mid-depth jerkbait, and a deep bait without adding any weight. Matt demonstrates how to adjust hooks and hook placement to get a variety of actions out of a fluke. If you’re looking for a single “do everything” bait this Spring, look no further than the fluke.

The Super Fluke is in every angler’s arsenal. Some use it as a Carolina rig bait, others as a stick bait, still others use it as a topwater. Today Matt explains some quick hook and bait modifications that will open doors to completely different ways to fish the Fluke. If you’ve been using the bait with a single-use approach, its time to learn what you’ve been missing!

Below is a breakdown of the baits, colors, and hook options that Matt recommends for fishing Flukes and other soft jerkbaits in the Spring and Summer.

Baits…

-Zoom Super Fluke: http://bit.ly/2aqys0H

-Strike King Caffeine Shad: http://bit.ly/2jjyvzr

-Bass Assassin Split Tail Shad: http://bit.ly/2JoeVCN

-Reaction Innovations Shiver Glide: http://bit.ly/2DUwrtM

Hooks and Hardware…

-Gamakatsu Offset EWG Wide Gap 4/0: http://bit.ly/2d07gvp

-Gamakatsu Superline EWG 4/0: http://bit.ly/2ac92XG

-Gamakatsu Finesse Wide Gap 1/0: http://bit.ly/2aKGmHM

-Gamakatsu Finesse Wide Gap Weedless: http://bit.ly/2i57dOP

-Owner CPS Spring Medium: http://bit.ly/2b2YgDf

-Decoy Versatile Keeper: http://bit.ly/2NNtJci

Best Bait Colors are white or shad, Ghost, and Green Pumpkin.

All-Around Combo…

Rod- Zodias 7’2″ Medium Heavy: http://bit.ly/2cgmMAe

Reel- Curado 150 DC: http://bit.ly/2yHtsp4

Line- 40 lb Power Pro Maxcuatro: http://bit.ly/2clBRiQ

Leader- 15 lb Maxima Ultragreen: http://bit.ly/2ae97J9

________________________________________________________________

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Jon B Breaks Down The Game Changing Trashmaster Jig

Watch Jon B break down one of his new favorite jigs!

Jon B Does It Again

Jon B is one of the most watched YouTube anglers on the internet. Known for legendary antics, a slick camera presence, and a keen ear for finding DOPE BEATS. Jon also happens to be an absolute bass hammer when you put a jig in his hand.

Recently, Jon set out for an afternoon of fishing with the all-new GameChanger Trashmaster and quickly put this revolutionary jig to work. Watch Jonny B get RIGGED up and lean into a big bass with one of his famous heavy hammer hooksets.

Two Ways To Rig The Trashmaster

Jon starts off by pairing his GameChanger Trashmaster with the Googan Baits Bandito Bug and then transitions into Swimjig showcase. Each technique presentation will get you jacked up and ready to go catch a toad. Here is a quick rigging breakdown:

Trashmaster + Bandito Bug = Cheat Code

Trashmaster
Jon starts off by biting a piece off the top of his Bandito Bug. Creating a flat surface will help the twist lock screw bite into the bait and stay secured.
Trashmaster
No need for a weedguard, the twist lock screw design tightly secures soft plastics while providing a weedless presentation.
Trashmaster
Twist the screw lock into the center of your plastic and provide gentle pressure while slowly rotating until the plastic reaches the top of the screw pin.
Trashmaster
The fully rigged jig will be virtually weedless and should look similar to this.
Trashmaster
Notice how flat the Bandito Bug lays when rigged properly. From head to tail this jig will be presented in a streamlined, fish friendly fashion.
Trashmaster
An absolute donk of a bass that fell victim to the Trashmaster Jig

”It’s important to have a bait that can get in the DUST”

Jon B

A Gamechanging Swim Jig

Why Didn’t We Think Of This Earlier?

Trashmaster
Next up Jon goes over how he pairs the 3/8 GameChanger Jig with a 4” Biospawn Exoswim.

Jon likes a shad patterned jig and swimbait which helps him accurately represent a variety of baitfish.
Trashmaster
Pin your screwlock into the top of the swimbait head and slowly rotate the bait up the screw lock skeeper.
Trashmaster
Once the plastic is locked tightly, bend back body of your swimbait so that it can be rigged in a weedless presentation.
Trashmaster
Jon shows off an example of a rigged swimjig set up. Making sure the hook is centered both at the head and back of the bait will help it swimming properly.
Trashmaster
Jon likes to Texpose his swimjig which he believes helps increase hook up percentage. This rigging method allows the hook to travel through less plastic before reaching the fish. So honestly, it makes sense.
Trashmaster
Another angle of Jon B’s chunky bass that couldn’t resist the jig.

Get Your Gear Here

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates thumbnail

For many anglers, New Zealand is known as a mecca for once in a lifetime size wild brown trout. My husband and I made the decision to go here for our honeymoon in search of these fish. For months leading up to our trip, my father repeatedly asked me, “have you practiced casting a 15ft leader yet?” Each time I quickly responded with a “nope” and moved on. I thought to myself, I’m a saltwater angler that constantly casts into chop and winds. I’ve got this. Boy was I wrong…

The Big Picture

Fly fishing in New Zealand should really be called hunting. These fish are smart. With such clarity in the water, the second you spot them they’ve likely spotted you. They smell human hunger. 15+ foot leaders and inconspicuous colored fly line and clothing is a must.

Big Picture Tips:

  • Always stay downstream of these fish. They can smell your scent if you cross upriver and then the pool is no longer worth fishing.
  • New Zealand fly fishing is all sight fishing. Look for gray moving shadows in gin clear waters. Like any type of sight fishing, once you spot a couple they become easier to find.
  • Because New Zealand trout have no real predators they can often be found out in the open in shallow waters.
  • Fish are easier to spot when the sun is high giving you a better glimpse into the river.
  • Walk the banks as quietly as possible as to not spook the fish… one noticeable thump and the fish you’ve been peeling your eyes to spot for the last hour is gone (made that mistake one too many times).
  • If unspooked and content, these fish will continue to feed happily giving you the time you need to properly set up for the perfect shot. Spend time observing their feeding behavior.
  • If dry fly fishing, the fly should lead the fish by roughly 2ft, nymphing by roughly 6ft.
  • Have a nymphing rod and dry fly rod set up so you’re ready for both circumstances.
  • 5wt/6wt should cover most situations that you encounter. 
  • Presentation of the fly is key for success meaning proper controlled drifts and no drag.
  • Practice turning over a 15ft leader before fishing these rivers. It’s all about stopping high on your backcast and as few false casts as possible to get the length you need to reach the fish. Waving a fly rod above their heads is guaranteed to spook the fish. Forget about double hauling.
  • Once you hook into these fish, get ready to move. New Zealand brown trout take off almost immediately and staying stagnant will cause the fish to break off.
  • Turn over rocks along the river to see what they’re feeding on.
  • At the end of the day, we’re all sipping flies. The sand flies are so bad along the river that there’s just nothing you can do about it.  A few flies a day never hurt anybody.
7lbs of New Zealand Gold

We quickly learned that New Zealand fly fishing is a mecca. We hunted for these fish. We tiptoed along the banks, crawled through the brush, and even used walkie talkies for communication. We wore only neutral colors so the fish had a difficult time spotting us. We used 15+ ft leaders so our fly line was inconspicuous. It’s easy for an instagram photo of a chunky brown trout to make this look easy but the truth is, it’s not. It takes a tremendous amount of patience, skills, determination, and understanding to land these fish. It took time for us to become dialed in. Definitely give yourself a few days if you’re planning on fishing New Zealand.

South Island

Without giving away any secret spots, the South Island of New Zealand is known for its tremendously fishy waters. We spent a lot of time fishing the Nelson area (northern part of the South Island) which proved to be incredible fishing and gorgeous scenery. The blue pools really do exist. During our trip, we constantly referenced John Kent’s South Island Trout Fishing Guide for guidance, tips, and access points.

Most valuable to our fly fishing success was our 4 days of guided fly fishing at Owen’s River Lodge at the beginning of our trip. This helped us get acclimated and our feet wet with local knowledge. We learned from our seasoned guide at the lodge, Paul, how to hunt for these fish. He was one of those guides that had a story about everything. He pushed us to become better anglers. I happen to love guides like this. My passion is just as intense when it comes to fly fishing.

Our Kiwi Friend Paul From Owen’s River Lodge

Each day in New Zealand was unique and memorable. We spent most of our days getting from place to place in our campervan that we picked up in Christchurch. For those interested in going to New Zealand this is a great way to explore the islands. The campervan allowed us greater mobility and to explore as much of the South Island as possible. Being a kiwi for two and a half weeks was one of the greatest experiences of my life.

You can follow along with Jenny Tates on Instagram at @jenny_tates.

Check out these other great articles about fishing New Zealand:

Angler’s Paradise: Fishing New Zealand with Shelen Boyes

The Fence Fight

Video: New Zealand Brown in Spring Creek

10 Things to Remember While Fishing in Variable Weather

Dropshot Fishing For Bass – Beginner To Advanced Tricks!

From Beginner to Advanced, we’re covering EVERYTHING you need to know about dropshot fishing. Wether its the first time you’re learning how to rig a dropshot setup or you’re hoping to understand when a shad shaped bait works better than a straight tail worm, this video is for you.

Tim breaks down the fine details of dropshot fishing including bait selection by category and action, when to use each style, how to rig them, and exactly what gear you’ll need to get the best chance at landing the bass you’ve been looking for. You can watch this video, pick a plastic worm and go catch fish with confidence, or you can jump all the way down the rabbit hole and understand the exact details and adjustments that can turn a good day into an epic day!

Below is a breakdown of all the gear discussed in the video. Tim has organized it by bait style to keep it as simple as possible.

Nose Hook Dropshot Baits…

Damiki Armor Shad Jerkbait: http://bit.ly/2VQ7g6o

Zoom Fluke: http://bit.ly/2OFjvjx

Jackall Crosstail Shad: http://bit.ly/2Crq8eP

Yamamoto Pro Senko: http://bit.ly/2vXUKln

Strike King Dream Shot: http://bit.ly/2aAoUoR

Strike King Half Shell: http://bit.ly/2iR9awm

Roboworm Alive Shad: http://bit.ly/2kDNeYw

Roboworm 4.5″ Fat Worm: http://bit.ly/2awYSxM

Drop Shot Swim Baits…

Keitech Swing Impact Fat Swimbait: http://bit.ly/2ab7s8v

Megabass Hazedong: http://bit.ly/2CIwgzt

Damiki Armor Shad: http://bit.ly/2KtPDAT

Keitech Easy Shiner: http://bit.ly/2bxJK6H

Wacky Rig Dropshot Baits…

5″ Senko: http://bit.ly/2axAmNS

Jackall Flick Shake: http://bit.ly/2bi3Gse

Zoom Trick Worm: http://bit.ly/2aWkG7E

Roboworm 6″ Straight Tail: http://bit.ly/2asZyH3

Texas- Rigged Dropshot Baits…

Reaction Innovations Flirt Worm: http://bit.ly/2CMB33J

Yamamoto Kut Tail Worm: http://bit.ly/2iXlzPu

Roboworm 6″ Fat Worm: http://bit.ly/2awYSxM

Daiwa Neko Slim: http://bit.ly/2kH4KuC

Nose/Wacky Hooks…

Owner Mosquito Light Hook: http://bit.ly/2zQVKx3

Gamakatsu Aaron Martens TGW Drop Shot Hook: http://bit.ly/2zGX441

Trokar Dropshot Hook: http://bit.ly/2ahxJOr

Texas-Rigging Hooks…

Owner Cover Shot Worm Hook: http://bit.ly/2ISr7bR

Gamakatsu G-Finesse Worm Light Hook: http://bit.ly/2VEmoEb

Trokar Straight Shank: http://bit.ly/2z2MJMM

Gamakatsu EWG Hook: http://bit.ly/2d07gvp

Weights…

Tungsten Tear Drop Weight: http://bit.ly/2V2B63h

Tunsten Pencil Weight: http://bit.ly/2UY7cgx

Lead Tear Drop Weight: http://bit.ly/2BjFCp3

Line Options…

Power Pro Braid: http://bit.ly/2g9c2GV

Sunline SX-1: http://bit.ly/2tn8EzQ

Sunline Sniper Fluoro: http://bit.ly/2p7fxju

Seaguar InvizX: http://bit.ly/2oVsG2Y

Sunline Assassin: http://bit.ly/2h4LNjm

Maxima Ultragreen: http://bit.ly/2ae97J9

Tims High-end Drop Shot Combo

G. Loomis NRX Spinning Rod 822DSR: http://bit.ly/2dX9zjv

Shimano Excense Spinning Reel: http://bit.ly/2iMtscV

Tims Budget Spinning Drop Shot Combo

Shimano SLX 7′ Med Lt: http://bit.ly/2AdvIC1

Shimano NASCI Reel: http://bit.ly/2g278cC

Tim’s Heavy Baitcast Dropshot Combo

Megabass Orochi XX Casting Rod 7’5″ Braillist: http://bit.ly/2OSVNwH

Metanium MGL: http://bit.ly/2ezIBfB

Screen Shot 2019-05-05 at 9.46.23 PM.jpg

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates thumbnail

For many anglers, New Zealand is known as a mecca for once in a lifetime size wild brown trout. My husband and I made the decision to go here for our honeymoon in search of these fish. For months leading up to our trip, my father repeatedly asked me, “have you practiced casting a 15ft leader yet?” Each time I quickly responded with a “nope” and moved on. I thought to myself, I’m a saltwater angler that constantly casts into chop and winds. I’ve got this. Boy was I wrong…

The Big Picture

Fly fishing in New Zealand should really be called hunting. These fish are smart. With such clarity in the water, the second you spot them they’ve likely spotted you. They smell human hunger. 15+ foot leaders and inconspicuous colored fly line and clothing is a must.

Big Picture Tips:

  • Always stay downstream of these fish. They can smell your scent if you cross upriver and then the pool is no longer worth fishing.
  • New Zealand fly fishing is all sight fishing. Look for gray moving shadows in gin clear waters. Like any type of sight fishing, once you spot a couple they become easier to find.
  • Because New Zealand trout have no real predators they can often be found out in the open in shallow waters.
  • Fish are easier to spot when the sun is high giving you a better glimpse into the river.
  • Walk the banks as quietly as possible as to not spook the fish… one noticeable thump and the fish you’ve been peeling your eyes to spot for the last hour is gone (made that mistake one too many times).
  • If unspooked and content, these fish will continue to feed happily giving you the time you need to properly set up for the perfect shot. Spend time observing their feeding behavior.
  • If dry fly fishing, the fly should lead the fish by roughly 2ft, nymphing by roughly 6ft.
  • Have a nymphing rod and dry fly rod set up so you’re ready for both circumstances.
  • 5wt/6wt should cover most situations that you encounter. 
  • Presentation of the fly is key for success meaning proper controlled drifts and no drag.
  • Practice turning over a 15ft leader before fishing these rivers. It’s all about stopping high on your backcast and as few false casts as possible to get the length you need to reach the fish. Waving a fly rod above their heads is guaranteed to spook the fish. Forget about double hauling.
  • Once you hook into these fish, get ready to move. New Zealand brown trout take off almost immediately and staying stagnant will cause the fish to break off.
  • Turn over rocks along the river to see what they’re feeding on.
  • At the end of the day, we’re all sipping flies. The sand flies are so bad along the river that there’s just nothing you can do about it.  A few flies a day never hurt anybody.
7lbs of New Zealand Gold

We quickly learned that New Zealand fly fishing is a mecca. We hunted for these fish. We tiptoed along the banks, crawled through the brush, and even used walkie talkies for communication. We wore only neutral colors so the fish had a difficult time spotting us. We used 15+ ft leaders so our fly line was inconspicuous. It’s easy for an instagram photo of a chunky brown trout to make this look easy but the truth is, it’s not. It takes a tremendous amount of patience, skills, determination, and understanding to land these fish. It took time for us to become dialed in. Definitely give yourself a few days if you’re planning on fishing New Zealand.

South Island

Without giving away any secret spots, the South Island of New Zealand is known for its tremendously fishy waters. We spent a lot of time fishing the Nelson area (northern part of the South Island) which proved to be incredible fishing and gorgeous scenery. The blue pools really do exist. During our trip, we constantly referenced John Kent’s South Island Trout Fishing Guide for guidance, tips, and access points.

Most valuable to our fly fishing success was our 4 days of guided fly fishing at Owen’s River Lodge at the beginning of our trip. This helped us get acclimated and our feet wet with local knowledge. We learned from our seasoned guide at the lodge, Paul, how to hunt for these fish. He was one of those guides that had a story about everything. He pushed us to become better anglers. I happen to love guides like this. My passion is just as intense when it comes to fly fishing.

Our Kiwi Friend Paul From Owen’s River Lodge

Each day in New Zealand was unique and memorable. We spent most of our days getting from place to place in our campervan that we picked up in Christchurch. For those interested in going to New Zealand this is a great way to explore the islands. The campervan allowed us greater mobility and to explore as much of the South Island as possible. Being a kiwi for two and a half weeks was one of the greatest experiences of my life.

You can follow along with Jenny Tates on Instagram at @jenny_tates.

Check out these other great articles about fishing New Zealand:

Angler’s Paradise: Fishing New Zealand with Shelen Boyes

The Fence Fight

Video: New Zealand Brown in Spring Creek

10 Things to Remember While Fishing in Variable Weather

Why My Kids Think Fly Fishing is all Sunshine, Rainbows, and Unicorns

Why My Kids Think Fly Fishing is all Sunshine, Rainbows, and Unicorns thumbnail

I learned to read and teach kids through guiding, and I knew that their attention span was limited (especially a kid with my DNA.) If any part of their first experience fishing sucked, they were way less likely to be into it.

My daughter Harper has been around the water and fly fishing since she was a baby.  I wanted us to have that time and those memories together for the rest of our lives, so I knew this much, “don’t F*** this up.” I’ve seen the dude that brings little Timmy to watch Dad throw streamers in the cold all day, (not cool dude) and Timmy looked miserable.

So I knew that I had to keep it as interesting as possible. From the time she was big enough to hold a fly rod, I have worked with her.  She learned to cast on a floppy five-weight fiberglass rod since they load so easily.

I have heard more times than I can count, “can’t wait until my kids are big enough.” Guess what, they’re big enough. Kids are amazing. Their brains are little sponges and they seem to be able to absorb info way quicker than most adults. I wanted everything she absorbed about fishing early on to be perfect. Kids love games, so at home, we made up different games and got creative on teaching her how to cast and make hook sets with those short little arms.

I waited for a day when I knew everything would be perfect for her when she was four years old (weather, water, fishing) and that’s what I’ve done ever since. That way no matter whatever happens in life, she’ll be able to close her eyes and imagine those 75 degree days in Arkansas catching fish in the sun.

This particular day I’ll have forever. We had stopped to wade Rainbow Island on the Little Red River. It was her first time wading. She had fished from a boat plenty, but wading takes a certain sense of “fishiness” to be really successful.  I witnessed something most people will never witness. A fly rod yielding, three feet tall little girl completely massacre a pile of rainbows.

They might has well have been trophy browns to her and I. I set her up with a set amount of line out of the reel, just enough to make an upstream cast, a mend, and then a swing on the downstream end of the drift. Towards the end of every other drift when her fly would start to swing up, a fish would tag it. She fishes with a 10’ 3 weight rod with a butt below the reel, so she can have the leverage of a 10ft rod and a weight small enough for her to be able to lay back on the rod and fight her heart out.  

Harper is 6 now and fishing better than ever, but it isn’t about the fishing at all. Sure, someday I’ll fill her in that catching and fishing are two different things, but for now, I’ll just enjoy that she thinks fly fishing is all sunshine, rainbows, and unicorns.

Story and photos from Cameron Lester. He is not only a dad but a husband, lake bum and fly fishing guide on Greers Ferry Lake and The Little Red River in Arkansas. You can also check out his Leadercast Podcast or give him a follow on Instagram.

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