Fluke Rigging Tricks to Catch Bass Shallow or Deep

Learn how to use a soft jerkbait as a topwater, a mid-depth jerkbait, and a deep bait without adding any weight. Matt demonstrates how to adjust hooks and hook placement to get a variety of actions out of a fluke. If you’re looking for a single “do everything” bait this Spring, look no further than the fluke.

The Super Fluke is in every angler’s arsenal. Some use it as a Carolina rig bait, others as a stick bait, still others use it as a topwater. Today Matt explains some quick hook and bait modifications that will open doors to completely different ways to fish the Fluke. If you’ve been using the bait with a single-use approach, its time to learn what you’ve been missing!

Below is a breakdown of the baits, colors, and hook options that Matt recommends for fishing Flukes and other soft jerkbaits in the Spring and Summer.

Baits…

-Zoom Super Fluke: http://bit.ly/2aqys0H

-Strike King Caffeine Shad: http://bit.ly/2jjyvzr

-Bass Assassin Split Tail Shad: http://bit.ly/2JoeVCN

-Reaction Innovations Shiver Glide: http://bit.ly/2DUwrtM

Hooks and Hardware…

-Gamakatsu Offset EWG Wide Gap 4/0: http://bit.ly/2d07gvp

-Gamakatsu Superline EWG 4/0: http://bit.ly/2ac92XG

-Gamakatsu Finesse Wide Gap 1/0: http://bit.ly/2aKGmHM

-Gamakatsu Finesse Wide Gap Weedless: http://bit.ly/2i57dOP

-Owner CPS Spring Medium: http://bit.ly/2b2YgDf

-Decoy Versatile Keeper: http://bit.ly/2NNtJci

Best Bait Colors are white or shad, Ghost, and Green Pumpkin.

All-Around Combo…

Rod- Zodias 7’2″ Medium Heavy: http://bit.ly/2cgmMAe

Reel- Curado 150 DC: http://bit.ly/2yHtsp4

Line- 40 lb Power Pro Maxcuatro: http://bit.ly/2clBRiQ

Leader- 15 lb Maxima Ultragreen: http://bit.ly/2ae97J9

________________________________________________________________

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Jon B Breaks Down The Game Changing Trashmaster Jig

Watch Jon B break down one of his new favorite jigs!

Jon B Does It Again

Jon B is one of the most watched YouTube anglers on the internet. Known for legendary antics, a slick camera presence, and a keen ear for finding DOPE BEATS. Jon also happens to be an absolute bass hammer when you put a jig in his hand.

Recently, Jon set out for an afternoon of fishing with the all-new GameChanger Trashmaster and quickly put this revolutionary jig to work. Watch Jonny B get RIGGED up and lean into a big bass with one of his famous heavy hammer hooksets.

Two Ways To Rig The Trashmaster

Jon starts off by pairing his GameChanger Trashmaster with the Googan Baits Bandito Bug and then transitions into Swimjig showcase. Each technique presentation will get you jacked up and ready to go catch a toad. Here is a quick rigging breakdown:

Trashmaster + Bandito Bug = Cheat Code

Trashmaster
Jon starts off by biting a piece off the top of his Bandito Bug. Creating a flat surface will help the twist lock screw bite into the bait and stay secured.
Trashmaster
No need for a weedguard, the twist lock screw design tightly secures soft plastics while providing a weedless presentation.
Trashmaster
Twist the screw lock into the center of your plastic and provide gentle pressure while slowly rotating until the plastic reaches the top of the screw pin.
Trashmaster
The fully rigged jig will be virtually weedless and should look similar to this.
Trashmaster
Notice how flat the Bandito Bug lays when rigged properly. From head to tail this jig will be presented in a streamlined, fish friendly fashion.
Trashmaster
An absolute donk of a bass that fell victim to the Trashmaster Jig

”It’s important to have a bait that can get in the DUST”

Jon B

A Gamechanging Swim Jig

Why Didn’t We Think Of This Earlier?

Trashmaster
Next up Jon goes over how he pairs the 3/8 GameChanger Jig with a 4” Biospawn Exoswim.

Jon likes a shad patterned jig and swimbait which helps him accurately represent a variety of baitfish.
Trashmaster
Pin your screwlock into the top of the swimbait head and slowly rotate the bait up the screw lock skeeper.
Trashmaster
Once the plastic is locked tightly, bend back body of your swimbait so that it can be rigged in a weedless presentation.
Trashmaster
Jon shows off an example of a rigged swimjig set up. Making sure the hook is centered both at the head and back of the bait will help it swimming properly.
Trashmaster
Jon likes to Texpose his swimjig which he believes helps increase hook up percentage. This rigging method allows the hook to travel through less plastic before reaching the fish. So honestly, it makes sense.
Trashmaster
Another angle of Jon B’s chunky bass that couldn’t resist the jig.

Get Your Gear Here

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates thumbnail

For many anglers, New Zealand is known as a mecca for once in a lifetime size wild brown trout. My husband and I made the decision to go here for our honeymoon in search of these fish. For months leading up to our trip, my father repeatedly asked me, “have you practiced casting a 15ft leader yet?” Each time I quickly responded with a “nope” and moved on. I thought to myself, I’m a saltwater angler that constantly casts into chop and winds. I’ve got this. Boy was I wrong…

The Big Picture

Fly fishing in New Zealand should really be called hunting. These fish are smart. With such clarity in the water, the second you spot them they’ve likely spotted you. They smell human hunger. 15+ foot leaders and inconspicuous colored fly line and clothing is a must.

Big Picture Tips:

  • Always stay downstream of these fish. They can smell your scent if you cross upriver and then the pool is no longer worth fishing.
  • New Zealand fly fishing is all sight fishing. Look for gray moving shadows in gin clear waters. Like any type of sight fishing, once you spot a couple they become easier to find.
  • Because New Zealand trout have no real predators they can often be found out in the open in shallow waters.
  • Fish are easier to spot when the sun is high giving you a better glimpse into the river.
  • Walk the banks as quietly as possible as to not spook the fish… one noticeable thump and the fish you’ve been peeling your eyes to spot for the last hour is gone (made that mistake one too many times).
  • If unspooked and content, these fish will continue to feed happily giving you the time you need to properly set up for the perfect shot. Spend time observing their feeding behavior.
  • If dry fly fishing, the fly should lead the fish by roughly 2ft, nymphing by roughly 6ft.
  • Have a nymphing rod and dry fly rod set up so you’re ready for both circumstances.
  • 5wt/6wt should cover most situations that you encounter. 
  • Presentation of the fly is key for success meaning proper controlled drifts and no drag.
  • Practice turning over a 15ft leader before fishing these rivers. It’s all about stopping high on your backcast and as few false casts as possible to get the length you need to reach the fish. Waving a fly rod above their heads is guaranteed to spook the fish. Forget about double hauling.
  • Once you hook into these fish, get ready to move. New Zealand brown trout take off almost immediately and staying stagnant will cause the fish to break off.
  • Turn over rocks along the river to see what they’re feeding on.
  • At the end of the day, we’re all sipping flies. The sand flies are so bad along the river that there’s just nothing you can do about it.  A few flies a day never hurt anybody.
7lbs of New Zealand Gold

We quickly learned that New Zealand fly fishing is a mecca. We hunted for these fish. We tiptoed along the banks, crawled through the brush, and even used walkie talkies for communication. We wore only neutral colors so the fish had a difficult time spotting us. We used 15+ ft leaders so our fly line was inconspicuous. It’s easy for an instagram photo of a chunky brown trout to make this look easy but the truth is, it’s not. It takes a tremendous amount of patience, skills, determination, and understanding to land these fish. It took time for us to become dialed in. Definitely give yourself a few days if you’re planning on fishing New Zealand.

South Island

Without giving away any secret spots, the South Island of New Zealand is known for its tremendously fishy waters. We spent a lot of time fishing the Nelson area (northern part of the South Island) which proved to be incredible fishing and gorgeous scenery. The blue pools really do exist. During our trip, we constantly referenced John Kent’s South Island Trout Fishing Guide for guidance, tips, and access points.

Most valuable to our fly fishing success was our 4 days of guided fly fishing at Owen’s River Lodge at the beginning of our trip. This helped us get acclimated and our feet wet with local knowledge. We learned from our seasoned guide at the lodge, Paul, how to hunt for these fish. He was one of those guides that had a story about everything. He pushed us to become better anglers. I happen to love guides like this. My passion is just as intense when it comes to fly fishing.

Our Kiwi Friend Paul From Owen’s River Lodge

Each day in New Zealand was unique and memorable. We spent most of our days getting from place to place in our campervan that we picked up in Christchurch. For those interested in going to New Zealand this is a great way to explore the islands. The campervan allowed us greater mobility and to explore as much of the South Island as possible. Being a kiwi for two and a half weeks was one of the greatest experiences of my life.

You can follow along with Jenny Tates on Instagram at @jenny_tates.

Check out these other great articles about fishing New Zealand:

Angler’s Paradise: Fishing New Zealand with Shelen Boyes

The Fence Fight

Video: New Zealand Brown in Spring Creek

10 Things to Remember While Fishing in Variable Weather

Dropshot Fishing For Bass – Beginner To Advanced Tricks!

From Beginner to Advanced, we’re covering EVERYTHING you need to know about dropshot fishing. Wether its the first time you’re learning how to rig a dropshot setup or you’re hoping to understand when a shad shaped bait works better than a straight tail worm, this video is for you.

Tim breaks down the fine details of dropshot fishing including bait selection by category and action, when to use each style, how to rig them, and exactly what gear you’ll need to get the best chance at landing the bass you’ve been looking for. You can watch this video, pick a plastic worm and go catch fish with confidence, or you can jump all the way down the rabbit hole and understand the exact details and adjustments that can turn a good day into an epic day!

Below is a breakdown of all the gear discussed in the video. Tim has organized it by bait style to keep it as simple as possible.

Nose Hook Dropshot Baits…

Damiki Armor Shad Jerkbait: http://bit.ly/2VQ7g6o

Zoom Fluke: http://bit.ly/2OFjvjx

Jackall Crosstail Shad: http://bit.ly/2Crq8eP

Yamamoto Pro Senko: http://bit.ly/2vXUKln

Strike King Dream Shot: http://bit.ly/2aAoUoR

Strike King Half Shell: http://bit.ly/2iR9awm

Roboworm Alive Shad: http://bit.ly/2kDNeYw

Roboworm 4.5″ Fat Worm: http://bit.ly/2awYSxM

Drop Shot Swim Baits…

Keitech Swing Impact Fat Swimbait: http://bit.ly/2ab7s8v

Megabass Hazedong: http://bit.ly/2CIwgzt

Damiki Armor Shad: http://bit.ly/2KtPDAT

Keitech Easy Shiner: http://bit.ly/2bxJK6H

Wacky Rig Dropshot Baits…

5″ Senko: http://bit.ly/2axAmNS

Jackall Flick Shake: http://bit.ly/2bi3Gse

Zoom Trick Worm: http://bit.ly/2aWkG7E

Roboworm 6″ Straight Tail: http://bit.ly/2asZyH3

Texas- Rigged Dropshot Baits…

Reaction Innovations Flirt Worm: http://bit.ly/2CMB33J

Yamamoto Kut Tail Worm: http://bit.ly/2iXlzPu

Roboworm 6″ Fat Worm: http://bit.ly/2awYSxM

Daiwa Neko Slim: http://bit.ly/2kH4KuC

Nose/Wacky Hooks…

Owner Mosquito Light Hook: http://bit.ly/2zQVKx3

Gamakatsu Aaron Martens TGW Drop Shot Hook: http://bit.ly/2zGX441

Trokar Dropshot Hook: http://bit.ly/2ahxJOr

Texas-Rigging Hooks…

Owner Cover Shot Worm Hook: http://bit.ly/2ISr7bR

Gamakatsu G-Finesse Worm Light Hook: http://bit.ly/2VEmoEb

Trokar Straight Shank: http://bit.ly/2z2MJMM

Gamakatsu EWG Hook: http://bit.ly/2d07gvp

Weights…

Tungsten Tear Drop Weight: http://bit.ly/2V2B63h

Tunsten Pencil Weight: http://bit.ly/2UY7cgx

Lead Tear Drop Weight: http://bit.ly/2BjFCp3

Line Options…

Power Pro Braid: http://bit.ly/2g9c2GV

Sunline SX-1: http://bit.ly/2tn8EzQ

Sunline Sniper Fluoro: http://bit.ly/2p7fxju

Seaguar InvizX: http://bit.ly/2oVsG2Y

Sunline Assassin: http://bit.ly/2h4LNjm

Maxima Ultragreen: http://bit.ly/2ae97J9

Tims High-end Drop Shot Combo

G. Loomis NRX Spinning Rod 822DSR: http://bit.ly/2dX9zjv

Shimano Excense Spinning Reel: http://bit.ly/2iMtscV

Tims Budget Spinning Drop Shot Combo

Shimano SLX 7′ Med Lt: http://bit.ly/2AdvIC1

Shimano NASCI Reel: http://bit.ly/2g278cC

Tim’s Heavy Baitcast Dropshot Combo

Megabass Orochi XX Casting Rod 7’5″ Braillist: http://bit.ly/2OSVNwH

Metanium MGL: http://bit.ly/2ezIBfB

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Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates

Planning Your First Trip to New Zealand – Big Picture Tips from Jenny Tates thumbnail

For many anglers, New Zealand is known as a mecca for once in a lifetime size wild brown trout. My husband and I made the decision to go here for our honeymoon in search of these fish. For months leading up to our trip, my father repeatedly asked me, “have you practiced casting a 15ft leader yet?” Each time I quickly responded with a “nope” and moved on. I thought to myself, I’m a saltwater angler that constantly casts into chop and winds. I’ve got this. Boy was I wrong…

The Big Picture

Fly fishing in New Zealand should really be called hunting. These fish are smart. With such clarity in the water, the second you spot them they’ve likely spotted you. They smell human hunger. 15+ foot leaders and inconspicuous colored fly line and clothing is a must.

Big Picture Tips:

  • Always stay downstream of these fish. They can smell your scent if you cross upriver and then the pool is no longer worth fishing.
  • New Zealand fly fishing is all sight fishing. Look for gray moving shadows in gin clear waters. Like any type of sight fishing, once you spot a couple they become easier to find.
  • Because New Zealand trout have no real predators they can often be found out in the open in shallow waters.
  • Fish are easier to spot when the sun is high giving you a better glimpse into the river.
  • Walk the banks as quietly as possible as to not spook the fish… one noticeable thump and the fish you’ve been peeling your eyes to spot for the last hour is gone (made that mistake one too many times).
  • If unspooked and content, these fish will continue to feed happily giving you the time you need to properly set up for the perfect shot. Spend time observing their feeding behavior.
  • If dry fly fishing, the fly should lead the fish by roughly 2ft, nymphing by roughly 6ft.
  • Have a nymphing rod and dry fly rod set up so you’re ready for both circumstances.
  • 5wt/6wt should cover most situations that you encounter. 
  • Presentation of the fly is key for success meaning proper controlled drifts and no drag.
  • Practice turning over a 15ft leader before fishing these rivers. It’s all about stopping high on your backcast and as few false casts as possible to get the length you need to reach the fish. Waving a fly rod above their heads is guaranteed to spook the fish. Forget about double hauling.
  • Once you hook into these fish, get ready to move. New Zealand brown trout take off almost immediately and staying stagnant will cause the fish to break off.
  • Turn over rocks along the river to see what they’re feeding on.
  • At the end of the day, we’re all sipping flies. The sand flies are so bad along the river that there’s just nothing you can do about it.  A few flies a day never hurt anybody.
7lbs of New Zealand Gold

We quickly learned that New Zealand fly fishing is a mecca. We hunted for these fish. We tiptoed along the banks, crawled through the brush, and even used walkie talkies for communication. We wore only neutral colors so the fish had a difficult time spotting us. We used 15+ ft leaders so our fly line was inconspicuous. It’s easy for an instagram photo of a chunky brown trout to make this look easy but the truth is, it’s not. It takes a tremendous amount of patience, skills, determination, and understanding to land these fish. It took time for us to become dialed in. Definitely give yourself a few days if you’re planning on fishing New Zealand.

South Island

Without giving away any secret spots, the South Island of New Zealand is known for its tremendously fishy waters. We spent a lot of time fishing the Nelson area (northern part of the South Island) which proved to be incredible fishing and gorgeous scenery. The blue pools really do exist. During our trip, we constantly referenced John Kent’s South Island Trout Fishing Guide for guidance, tips, and access points.

Most valuable to our fly fishing success was our 4 days of guided fly fishing at Owen’s River Lodge at the beginning of our trip. This helped us get acclimated and our feet wet with local knowledge. We learned from our seasoned guide at the lodge, Paul, how to hunt for these fish. He was one of those guides that had a story about everything. He pushed us to become better anglers. I happen to love guides like this. My passion is just as intense when it comes to fly fishing.

Our Kiwi Friend Paul From Owen’s River Lodge

Each day in New Zealand was unique and memorable. We spent most of our days getting from place to place in our campervan that we picked up in Christchurch. For those interested in going to New Zealand this is a great way to explore the islands. The campervan allowed us greater mobility and to explore as much of the South Island as possible. Being a kiwi for two and a half weeks was one of the greatest experiences of my life.

You can follow along with Jenny Tates on Instagram at @jenny_tates.

Check out these other great articles about fishing New Zealand:

Angler’s Paradise: Fishing New Zealand with Shelen Boyes

The Fence Fight

Video: New Zealand Brown in Spring Creek

10 Things to Remember While Fishing in Variable Weather

Why My Kids Think Fly Fishing is all Sunshine, Rainbows, and Unicorns

Why My Kids Think Fly Fishing is all Sunshine, Rainbows, and Unicorns thumbnail

I learned to read and teach kids through guiding, and I knew that their attention span was limited (especially a kid with my DNA.) If any part of their first experience fishing sucked, they were way less likely to be into it.

My daughter Harper has been around the water and fly fishing since she was a baby.  I wanted us to have that time and those memories together for the rest of our lives, so I knew this much, “don’t F*** this up.” I’ve seen the dude that brings little Timmy to watch Dad throw streamers in the cold all day, (not cool dude) and Timmy looked miserable.

So I knew that I had to keep it as interesting as possible. From the time she was big enough to hold a fly rod, I have worked with her.  She learned to cast on a floppy five-weight fiberglass rod since they load so easily.

I have heard more times than I can count, “can’t wait until my kids are big enough.” Guess what, they’re big enough. Kids are amazing. Their brains are little sponges and they seem to be able to absorb info way quicker than most adults. I wanted everything she absorbed about fishing early on to be perfect. Kids love games, so at home, we made up different games and got creative on teaching her how to cast and make hook sets with those short little arms.

I waited for a day when I knew everything would be perfect for her when she was four years old (weather, water, fishing) and that’s what I’ve done ever since. That way no matter whatever happens in life, she’ll be able to close her eyes and imagine those 75 degree days in Arkansas catching fish in the sun.

This particular day I’ll have forever. We had stopped to wade Rainbow Island on the Little Red River. It was her first time wading. She had fished from a boat plenty, but wading takes a certain sense of “fishiness” to be really successful.  I witnessed something most people will never witness. A fly rod yielding, three feet tall little girl completely massacre a pile of rainbows.

They might has well have been trophy browns to her and I. I set her up with a set amount of line out of the reel, just enough to make an upstream cast, a mend, and then a swing on the downstream end of the drift. Towards the end of every other drift when her fly would start to swing up, a fish would tag it. She fishes with a 10’ 3 weight rod with a butt below the reel, so she can have the leverage of a 10ft rod and a weight small enough for her to be able to lay back on the rod and fight her heart out.  

Harper is 6 now and fishing better than ever, but it isn’t about the fishing at all. Sure, someday I’ll fill her in that catching and fishing are two different things, but for now, I’ll just enjoy that she thinks fly fishing is all sunshine, rainbows, and unicorns.

Story and photos from Cameron Lester. He is not only a dad but a husband, lake bum and fly fishing guide on Greers Ferry Lake and The Little Red River in Arkansas. You can also check out his Leadercast Podcast or give him a follow on Instagram.

10 Tips for Fishing with Your Kids

The Tiny Angler

Fly Fishing Revelations & Rewards

Visiting a river with regularity reveals how the water  is truly a world unto itself.

Going fishing means trying to catch fish. That part means focusing on the water. Of course, there are other parts. One must avoid streamside obstacles when walking or casting. Other things, like trees, rocks, or non-fish animals are difficult to ignore. But the fishing, especially if intermittent, demands a deliberate focus upon the water.

When you spend a lot of time on a particular river you start to allow yourself notice things. The obstacles become familiar. Avoiding them becomes second nature. So do the  trees and rocks. More importantly, so do the feeding lanes of fish. Structure, cover, and favorite lies make themselves clear. Sometimes this information is gathered by trial and error. You spook a fish every day for a week until you realize that there is a fish there. If you are coming back the next day, this is valuable information. You learn spots. You get to know fish.

Perhaps you even ascertain when a certain fish is in Spot A, and what time of day that same fish moves to Spot B.

For the better part of a year I fished a spring creek multiple times a week. I became very familiar with streamside obstacles, trees, and rocks. A river that I had fished intermittently became alive in ways that enriched my experience and amplified my ability to read the water. This led to more fish. I’ll even say that this led to more rewarding fish.

Continue reading “Fly Fishing Revelations & Rewards”

Giant Texas Bass! Fishing Lake Alan Henry

Giant Texas Bass! Fishing Lake Alan Henry thumbnail

On the road again! Matt Allen and family can’t be stopped, they are eating
up the miles like the bass on Lake Alan Henry are eating swimbaits! Come
along as Matt Allen gets to test new waters with his favorite old method:
SwimBaiting for giant bass bites!

Karl’s Guide To Selecting A Sinker Weight

Karl’s Guide To Selecting A Sinker Weight thumbnail

No matter what species of fish you target, you should have your tacklebox stocked with sinkers.

A sinker is basically a weight made from lead, brass or tungsten steel that sinks your bait down to bottom-hugging fish. Sinkers come in a wide range of weights and shapes for anglers to use for various fishing tactics. Here are six types of sinkers available at Karl’s the market and some tips on when and where each type of weight works best.

No Roll Sinker Weights

I remember when I was a kid my Dad would use this type of sinker to tight line for catfish on the Mississippi River. These flat, tear-shaped sinkers are ideal for fishing in heavy current because the weights lay flat on the bottom to prevent the current from rolling them. The no-roll sinker is a slip weight which allows you to feed line through it and attach the line to a swivel followed by the leader line with the bait hook similar to a Carolina rig for bass. This setup works best for fishing in strong current for catfish or sturgeon on the big rivers such as the Mississippi, Missouri and Columbia.

Dropshot Stick Weights

The most popular dropshot weights are the ball-shaped sinkers, but there are times when you need a stick-shaped weight for catching bass around specific types of cover. The stick weight can be considered a finesse sinker because its slender shape allows it to slide through grass, brush or other thick cover without snagging. You can also drop shot with this weight along bottoms with boulders because it slips easily through the rock crevices whereas the ball-shaped weight tends to roll and get stuck in narrow cracks. The stick weight is also ideal for drop shotting in heavy current because the cylinder shape allows the weight to drift with the flow and tick the tops of the rocky bottom without rolling down into the rocks where it can get snagged.

Egg Sinkers

These are my favorite sinkers for Carolina rigging for bass. The egg-shape sinker is ideal for dragging along mud, sand or gravel bottoms where it stirs up silt and debris to attract a bass’ attention to the bait trailing the weight. As the weight bumps bottom, the shape of the sinker allows you to keep contact with the bottom better than other types of sinkers. Keeping constant contact with the bottom also helps you determine the type of bottom you are fishing. I use a lightweight sinker such as a 1/4-ounce weight for Carolina-rigging at depths of less than 10 feet and switch to 3/4- or 1-ounce sinkers when I want to drag a rig in the 15- to 25-foot range.

Split Shot Sinkers

I use split shots for a variety of fish including bass, bluegill, crappie, and trout. Split shots are usually bb-sized or larger round weights that can be crimped on the line at various lengths above your hook. These small baits are best for using in shallow-water applications or for weighing down a bait set below a bobber. When fishing a bobber rig, I use the smallest weight possible for fishing a worm or cricket so bluegill will not feel the resistance of the weight when it inhales my bait. One of my favorite tactics for catching pressured spawning bass in murky shallow water is the split-shot rig. I pinch a Number 4 (about 1/8 ounce) split shot about 1 foot in front of a plastic lizard and drag it slowly along a gravel bank to tempt finicky bass on beds.

Casting Sinkers

I have used these bell-shaped sinkers effectively for drop-shotting for bass, but this style of sinker works great for shore anglers because it casts well allowing them to throw their baits long distances. When fishing from a boat, you can use the sinker on a three-way rig consisting of a three-way swivel with one eyelet for the main line, the second loop for a drop line attached to the sinker and the final loop for a leader with a lure or live bait attached. The round shape of the weight reduces the risk of snagging so the three-way rig is effective for bouncing along the bottom when drifting or trolling in open water.

Pyramid Sinkers

The Ancient Egyptians believed in Pyramid Power and you can too when you use these sinkers with an inverted pyramid profile. This sinker works best in fastcurrents because its streamlined shape causes it to sink quickly and the weight’s flat edges prevent it from rolling in the strong flow. When fishing in sand or mud bottoms, the sinker will bury itself in the soft bottom to keep the bait in the same place. The sinker’s ability to hold fast in current makes it the top choice of striper anglers for surf fishing.

The New Baby Bull Shad From Mike Bucca And The Catch Co.

The Baby bull shad is here! Originating out west, large-bodied swimbaits have developed a cultlike following that has spread throughout the country. Incredible fish drawing power and the ability to specifically target the big ones are a few reasons why people love swimbaits. Mike Bucca is already a legend, known for creating a west coast style swimbait in a color pattern and size option that matches a common forage type (shad). Catch Co. worked with Triton Mike to create a downsized, commercial version of his highly effective bait without sacrificing on action or quality.

How To Fish The Baby Bull Shad

The Baby Bull Shad has the versatility to be fished both fast and slow and can also be twitched to produce a back and forth walking motion. Burning your bait will create a subsurface action that will drive fish wild. While counting down the Bull Shad to the desired swimming depth and imparting a slow, steady retrieve is a good way to keep your lure deeper in the strike zone.

Another Baby Bull Shad bonus is its ability to produce more bites when compared to the larger sized swimbaits. This is a plus for both tournament sticks and entry-level swimbait anglers trying to get comfortable throwing bigger baits.

Baby Bull Shad Pro Tips

Baby Bull Shad
The Pearl Bone Baby Bull Shad

When casting to cover, always try to cast well past the target you plan on fishing, this helps prevent spooking fish. The first cast you make at a target is usually the most likely to get bit, make sure it’s a good one!

Each Bucca Shad comes with a synthetic tail with little nylon fibers adding to the realism of each bait. After continued use, your tail fibers may get warped or bent out of shape. To fix, dip your tail into boiling water for 2 seconds and it should reset itself.

If you’re noticing followers chasing your bait back to the boat, let your baby bull shad sink a little deeper. If you see the following fish, the following fish can probably see you. Fishing deeper is a good way to help turn the following fish into keepers.

If you have ever seen Mike Bucca fish one of his swimbaits, you will often see him reeling quickly to keep his bait right up at the surface. This creates that killer wake and gives the bass an easy target. Much like his larger models, the Baby Bull Shad can be fished this same way to attract big bass. Alternatively, slow it down or add in some twitches to trigger strikes from bass that aren’t looking to chase.

Rod Recommendations For The Baby Bull Shad

A medium to medium-heavy rod will do the trick. You won’t need a heavy swimbait rod with the Baby Bucca Shad. Weighing 1/2 oz, this lure works best on a crankbait rod with moderate action. The added parabolic bend helps increase casting distance and will also serve as a shock absorber while fighting a fish.

Reel Recommendations For The Baby Bull Shad

Reel preference depends on the angler and their style of swimbait fishing. Generally, a moderate speed reel is what I recommend, they’re versatile and help keep a balanced retrieval speed. They’ve always help me slow my swimbait down without even realizing it.

Baby Bull Shad